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When commenting to a Belgian bartender that Oud Zottergem's bruin was not particularly bruin, he told me color is not a real issue in defining oud bruin. This idea was first posed to me by Johnny Fincioen, the owner of the Global Beer Network, a native Belgian who imports a wonderful line of beers. A contributor to this site commented that the difference between red and brown ale was actually regional. Don Feinberg of Vanberg & DeWulf added that the referrence to "red ale" was likely to have come about due to the creation of Rodenbach. As it was clearer, reder and generally more beautiful than the typical oud bruin (which I believe is true) it was deservent of it's own designation. Anyway, though there are differences between classic oud bruin and the benchmark red ale - Rodenbach (sometimes referred to as the "Burgundy of Belgium"), they are outweighed by their similarities. The most recognized Oud Bruin, Liefmans Goudenband, is a spectacular beer thought I believe it has gone down hill in the last year. None the less I will always remember my first sip of this fabulous brew fondly. Other examples of the style are more or less lactic, some leaning towards the sweet side. A bruin originating from the same town as Goudenband, Felix, is noticably more tart. I would guess, based on its flavor, that it is not blended. Despite producing a benchmark bruin, Leifman's makes a beer called Oud Bruin that is not Goudenband. The difference between to two is the oud bruin is not blended. Blending is a very significant practice in oud bruin production. Aging oud bruin makes it overwhelmingly (for most, not for me) tart. The malty sweetness some have is generally because younger beer has been blended with a lesser amount of aged, sour beer. Ichtegem's, for example, is a blend of 70% young beer to 30% old. Oud Zottergem's is another example of a beer that is only slightly tart, with a bready sweetness being more dominent. Rodenbach makes three different versions of their beer, including the unblended red and the blended grand cru. The third is a sweetened beer, having cherry essence added to aged beer. The general profiles that all share go something like this. Final gravity is about 1/4 starting gravity and the average ABV is around 5.5%. Duchesse de Bourgogne is the most powerful I have found with an ABV of 6.2%. They tend to not have hoppy aromas, nor is the use of black patient or chocolate malt or roasted barley given away by the nose. Aromas are usually tart, fruity and floral, never with the buttery scent of diacetyl or spices. Hop character in the taste is always beaten back by sourness with some examples also emphasising sweetness or fruitiness. The afore mentioned grains are seldom the source of color. This is usually the result of crystal malts and long boils. Lighter versions, such as Rodenbach, derives color from more medium colored malts like Vienna. Styles Page Lambic Ale Abbey and Trappist Ale Witbier Brown Ale Amber Ale Strong Golden Ale Specialties Saison Pilsner Home | Beer Chat | Examples | Travel Guide | Pronunciation | Tasting | Glasses | Find Beer | Brew Beer  CANDI SUGAR Candi sugar is really just rock candy. I have found the light variety in Indian grocery stores. Candy shops sell bagged rock candy. In my limited experience I found this to be a cheaper option. Of course brew supply shops can carry candi sugar as well and in both dark and light. For the real entrepreneur, rock candi can be made right in your kitchen. Just heat a solution of plain white sugar and water,then put it in a tall container and drop strings in. For dark candi sugar keep it on the stove longer and it will caramelize (turn brown). In time the dissolved sugar will crystallize around the string. This will require planning as it can take many weeks. In theory, pure cane sugar is the same as to candi sugar, it's all just sucrose. I have used plain sugar, candi sugar and home made rock candy. The plain sugar gave a Tripple I brewed a very "cheap" flavor. Candi sugar was definitely better, however my best results came from homegrown rock candy. I have no explanation as to why. FRUIT Raspberries, peaches and - for the more daring lambic brewer - black currents are what you might expect. The normal everyday versions that are available in your local supermarkets and produce stands are what you want. I have no information about grapes for the Muscat brewer, but I would be inclined to try a wine making variety as opposed to Concord. A variety of extracts are available through stores that carry wine making supplies. Cherries are the odd fruit out. Resist the temptation to toss sweet eating varieties into your Lambic. What you want are sour or "pie" cherries. These are in season at the end of June and I have found that they freeze uncommonly well. The ones that I found were yellowish and red. This is no doubt due to picking pre-ripened fruit. I've also gone to pick-your-own farms and found sour cherries that were candiapple red and truly wonderful in terms of look and taste. I kept the store bought ones in the freezer for six months, and when I thawed them I found they had a huge cherry pie aroma. As far as sanitizing goes I have read that as many as 70 wild yeast varieties can be in a Lambic. Since almost all the bacteria in Lambic ale is the kind you must avoid in conventional brewing anyway, I decided to just rinse and freeze ( which will not kill a lot of microorganisms). No bad results to report. CORRIANDER Coriander is a beauty. It is a great spice on its own, but it is usually associated with the use of Curacao orange peel in the making of wit bier. Ironically, the orange peel is not the source of the citrusy flavor of Wit, that is provided by the coriander! Coriander is a bi-product of the cilantro plant. If You've ever eaten Indian or a good grade of Mexican food you know what that is. Coriander is the seed you end up with when cilantro goes to seed. There are those who insist that this tan, pepper corn-like seed must be ground finely to be useful. I will not refute this as I am no expert, but my experience has clearly shown otherwise. I brewed a golden ale with some coriander once, crushing it with a rolling pin to break the husks and adding it into the secondary fermentation. It worked great. It can be boiled briefly, be added at knock out or even later. There are no rules, except for one-its influence will fade over time, blending with the flavors of whatever beer its in. ORANGE PEEL Curacao orange peel is an unusual thing. We've all bought oranges at the store. We pick over the bin and grab the ones that are most, well, orange. Sometimes we go for the part green ones,which are often tastier than their commercial navel counterparts though not as visually appealing. So you order bitter orange peel and figure "Hey, I know what I'm in for." Then they arrive, you rip open the package, gasp and scream "Those %&**@#% brew shop morons sent me mold!" Good news, you'd be wrong (probably!). I've only seen photos of Cura‡ao orange peel, but they corroborate other descriptions I've heard. They are bluish-green with white under sides and horrible looking. Be thankful the photo here is not in color! This seasoning is a major component of Wit bier, contributing not the citrusy tartness, but a more herbal presence. They seem to be hard to find but probably worth it. The way I see it, nobody would put something that ugly into their beer if it wasn't a REAL good idea! MISC. SPICES Although spices are used spiratically at best in modern brewing, there was a day when they were popular. These were the days preceding introduction of the hop, when the role of microbiology was not understood. Off-flavors were more common than in today's controlled brewing environment. It has been suggested that this was the reason for using spices, as they could hide significant imperfections. Perhaps modern the use of spices is a hold over from those times. They may be added at the end of the boil but seldom during, or in the secondary fermentation. Keep in mind their influence will deminish in time. Ginger: My only experience with this spice was in a stout. I added a sliver of fresh ginger into every bottle a week after bottling (I was young!). The beer was not contaminated, had an verwhelming ginger flavor and gushed soft foam upon opening. Cumin: Unusual (duh!). Try some Wit Amber if you're curious. Paradise/Cardamom Seeds: An old, exotic spice said to have been grown in the hanging gardens of Babylon. One of the worlds most expensive spices, it is aromatic (used in some perfumes) and a reputed aphrodisiac. Nutmeg: I put this in my Holiday Barley Wine. I prefer it in nut form, broken into large pieces with a hammer. 1 nut per gallon in this heavy beer (OG:.122, TG:.040) is plenty. Sweet Gale Seeds: Noted in Radiate's book on Belgian Ale. Has a bitter, aromatic leaf. I put some in boiling water to check out its aroma. It was a dead ringer for fennel sausage. 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L Q й т " )+YщЧЫ1 6 ё ѕ H Q П ы " џџ mike winslow2Hardly Driving:Desktop Folder:OUD BRUIN AND spices mike winslow>Hardly Driving:Mike's Beer:BABC News:news:OUD BRUIN AND spicesџ@€,,d3Gи,,Мю5B* CJOJQJ@& 5B* CJOJQJ$@& 5B* CJ OJQJ$5B* CJOJQJ$5B* CJOJQJш +,-89:žW X Y   Ь Э  0@1@1@0X0X@1Z@0 X0p@ 1r@0"X08@ 0$X0Њ@ 1Ќ@0&X0@ 0(X0@ 0КR@ GTimes New Roman5€Symbol3 Arial? Courier New3TimesEBraganzaITC TTEApple Chancery5 Geneva"pˆаhs:YІY& хв %ЅРДД€2№I  Щџџ mike winslow mike winslowўџ еЭеœ.“—+,љЎDеЭеœ.“—+,љЎ,ш hp|„Œ” œЄЌД М Ъ'eI b  Title˜ ўџџџџџ РFMicrosoft Word DocumentўџџџNB6WWord.Document.8 [4@ёџ4NormalCJOJPJQJmH <A@ђџЁ<Default Paragraph Font8Y@ђ8 Document Map-D OJQJ Xџџџџ!џџбV џџр]X џџ|Xц ч,-9:žŸX Y   Э Ю  " Р!”Ў6> _PID_GUID'AN{D8237081-A375-11D5-A27A-003065BC5916}ўџ р…ŸђљOhЋ‘+'Гй0`ˆœЈРЬм є  ( 4@HPX' ss mike winslowWoikeNormaln mike winslowWo2keMicrosoft Word 8.0d@vнA@ђІEН7С@žшў?Схв &X(X*Xќќ$ьЅСs П^)jbjbР Р \ЊkЊk џџџџџџ]мммммм4єvvvv ‚(ќ ькккккЛЛЛikkkkkk,ш єм \—eмЛЛЛЛЛ—KммкксЊ0KKKЛ2мкмкi№""ммммЛiKKiммiž ’…ЬЗ(Nvэ^i  OUD BRUIN AND FLANDERS RED ALE Another manifestation of Belgian sour beer, Flemish brown ale - or Oud Bruin - can boasts the same boldly lactic character of the lambic family but generally without the horsey character. Another variety of sour ale is referred to as "Flander's red ale". Though there are different viewpoints on this, there is much reliable information to suggest oud bruin and Flanders red are really the same style. When commenting to a Belgian bartender that Oud Zottergem's bruin was not particularly bruin, he told me color is not a real issue in defining oud bruin. This idea was first posed to me by Johnny Fincioen, the owner of the Global Beer Network, a native Belgian who imports a wonderful line of beers. A contributor to this site commented that the difference between red and brown ale was actually regional. Don Feinberg of Vanberg & DeWulf added that the referrence to "red ale" was likely to have come about due to the creation of Rodenbach. As it was clearer, reder and generally more beautiful than the typical oud bruin (which I believe is true) it was deservent of it's own designation. Anyway, though there are differences between classic oud bruin and the benchmark red ale - Rodenbach (sometimes referred to as the "Burgundy of Belgium"), they are outweighed by their similarities. The most recognized Oud Bruin, Liefmans Goudenband, is a spectacular beer thought I believe it has gone down hill in the last year. None the less I will always remember my first sip of this fabulous brew fondly. Other examples of the style are more or less lactic, some leaning towards the sweet side. A bruin originating from the same town as Goudenband, Felix, is noticably more tart. I would guess, based on its flavor, that it is not blended. Despite producing a benchmark bruin, Leifman's makes a beer called Oud Bruin that is not Goudenband. The difference between to two is the oud bruin is not blended. Blending is a very significant practice in oud bruin production. Aging oud bruin makes it overwhelmingly (for most, not for me) tart. The malty sweetness some have is generally because younger beer has been blended with a lesser amount of aged, sour beer. Ichtegem's, for example, is a blend of 70% young beer to 30% old. Oud Zottergem's is another example of a beer that is only slightly tart, with a bready sweetness being more dominent. Rodenbach makes three different versions of their beer, including the unblended red and the blended grand cru. The third is a sweetened beer, having cherry essence added to aged beer. The general profiles that all share go something like this. Final gravity is about 1/4 starting gravity and the average ABV is around 5.5%. Duchesse de Bourgogne is the most powerful I have found with an ABV of 6.2%. They tend to not have hoppy aromas, nor is the use of black patient or chocolate malt or roasted barley given away by the nose. Aromas are usually tart, fruity and floral, never with the buttery scent of diacetyl or spices. Hop character in the taste is always beaten back by sou-1Z]–˜œŸЈЋГЖТХвемпцщђѕў §AL,8#"#†%Ž%~&…&М&е&‘'™'C(U(ј(њ(ў() ) ))))!)-)0)=)@)G)J)Q)T)])^) X*XїэчнгЭгїЧчЧчЧчЧчСчЧчЧчЧчЧїэчэчэчэчэчэчэчэчэчэчїЧчЧчСчСчЧчСчЧчЧчЧЗ­5B* CJOJQJ5B* CJOJQJ B* OJQJ B*OJQJ B*OJQJ5B*CJOJQJ5B* CJOJQJ B*OJQJ5B*CJ$OJQJB*CJOJQJC-9  V Щ&1HPZ]hz†•–˜ 2Б§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§-9  V Щ&1HPZ]hz†•–˜ 2Б§оЙ AL,8 !"#"#ѓ$†%Ž%~&…&М&е&‘'™'C(U(ј(њ(^)6оЙ AL,8 !"#"#ѓ$†%Ž%~&…&М&е&‘'™'C(U(ј(њ(^) X"X$X&X§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§њњњ$Аа/ Ар=!А"А# $ %А
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